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Tracking Your Blood Sugar Levels

Consistently testing and tracking the blood sugar levels that you and your doctor have agreed on can tell you how well your type 2 diabetes plan is working.

Your doctor will work with you to determine the target levels that are best suited for you.

What Do My Blood Sugars Tell Me?

Checking your blood sugar levels is important, but keeping track of them in a written logbook or software will help you spot trends of blood sugar levels that are too high or too low. If you see a trend like this, be sure to discuss it with your doctor.

Keep in mind that if you have recently started a new type 2 diabetes therapy, it may take some time to see the results. Be sure to discuss with your doctor how long it should take before you see an improvement in your blood sugar levels.

  • If your doctor recommends blood sugar guidelines for you, he or she may ask you to check your blood sugar levels every day. Self-monitoring measures blood sugar levels at the time of the test, so it's important that your doctor also tests your A1C to see how well your blood sugar is being managed over time
  • The A1C test measures your average blood sugar level over the previous 2 to 3 months, and results are given as a percentage, called your A1C level. The higher your A1C level, the more sugar you have in your blood. If your A1C level is too high, you may need to change your diabetes treatment plan

References: 1. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK); US Department of Health and Human Services. Monitor your diabetes. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/manage-monitoring-diabetes/monitor-your-diabetes. Published February 2014. Accessed November 9, 2016. 2. American Diabetes Association (ADA). Checking your blood glucose. http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/blood-glucose-control/checking-your-blood-glucose.html. Last reviewed March 3, 2015. Last edited August 4, 2016. Accessed November 9, 2016. 3. Meetoo DD, Ochieng B, Wong L, Fatani T. Self-monitoring of blood glucose: is it justified? Nurse Prescribing. 2016;14(suppl 10):S10-S15.

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